Landlord loses eviction action

Landlord sued to evict tenants from six-unit building in order to provide apartment for son. Shlomo Karpen owns a six-unit, rent-stabilized building in Brooklyn comprised of two rented units on the first, second and third floors. In June 2018, Karpen notified the tenants in the rented apartments that he would not renew their leases and intended to take over the apartments to make a four-bedroom apartment for his son. In October 2018, Karpen commenced an … <Read More>


City Council Passes Three Bills Aimed at Stopping Income Discrimination and Providing Application Updates

The three bills provide transparency and protections for people seeking rental assistance. On October 29, 2020, the City Council voted to approve three rental assistance bills that would address income discrimination and provide more transparency in the rental assistance application process.


Loft board determination upheld

Tenants claimed a permanent residence in loft building. Loft tenants Maria Nazor and Peter Mickle have occupied units 4N and 4S of 544 West 27th Street in Chelsea since 1983 and 1995, respectively. In 2009, after two unsuccessful holdover proceedings, landlord Sydney Sol Group Ltd. (f/k/a Mushlam, Inc.) won a judgement of ejectment against Nazor and Mickle in New York County Supreme Court. In December 2010, the Supreme Court vacated the judgement of ejectment and … <Read More>


London Terrace case remanded

Landlord classified rental apartments as being destabilized and charged tenants market rate rents despite receiving J-51 tax benefits. London Terrace Gardens, located along West 23rd Street in Manhattan and built in 1930, occupies an entire block and has 1700 apartments. After the enactment of the Rent Regulation Reform Act of 1993, London Terrace Gardens began deregulating rent-stabilized apartments through high-rent vacancy decontrol. London Terrace Gardens subsequently received J-51 tax abatement and exemption benefits after … <Read More>


NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio Signs COVID-19 Relief Bills Into Law

Local Law addressing personal liability provisions in commercial leases raises constitutional law discussion. On May 26, 2020, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed seven COVID-19 relief bills into law during New York City’s first ever virtual bill signing. Among the laws, Local Law 55 of 2020, sponsored by Council Member Carlina Rivera, temporarily prevents the enforcement of personal liability provisions in commercial leases or rental agreements involving COVID-19 impacted tenants.  The law also makes it a … <Read More>


New York City Council Approves Two Bills Limiting Third-Party Delivery Service Fees

Council Bills intended to support the restaurant industry and small business. On May 13, 2020 the New York City Council voted to approve two bills intended to restrict the amount of fees third-party delivery services can charge restaurants during the COVID-19 pandemic and restaurant closures. Intro 1898-A, which essentially prevents fees to restaurants when no actual transaction results, was approved with 47 votes in the affirmative and three votes in the negative. Intro 1908-B, which … <Read More>